NEW LIBRARIANSHIP MASTER CLASS/MOOC ARCHIVE

Libraries have existed for millennia, but today the library field is searching for solid footing in an increasingly fragmented (and increasingly digital) information environment. What is librarianship when it is unmoored from cataloging, books, buildings, and committees?

The vision for a new librarianship must go beyond finding library-related uses for information technology and the Internet; it must provide a durable foundation for the field. New Librarianship recasts librarianship and library practice using the fundamental concept that knowledge is created though conversation. New librarians approach their work as facilitators of conversation; they seek to enrich, capture, store, and disseminate the conversations of their communities.

Join David Lankes for this online course that provides a foundation for practicing librarians and library science students in new librarianship. It builds on The Atlas of New Librarianship, the 2012 ABC CLIO/Greenwood Award for the Best Book in Library Literature and seeks to generate discussion about the future direction of the profession.

This content is archived from 2013, but Lankes will be monitoring comments and ready to reply.

Reference is Dead…Again

A brief history of developments in reference service and a discussion of reference must evolve in the concept of Library as Movement.

R. David Lankes is the director of the University of South Carolina’s School of Library and Information Science, and recipient of the American Library Association’s 2016 Ken Haycock Award for Promoting Librarianship. His book, The Atlas of New Librarianship won the 2012 ABC-CLIO/Greenwood Award for the Best Book in Library Literature. Lankes is a passionate advocate for librarians and their essential role in today’s society.

Communities in Crisis

How do libraries respond in times of crisis? They dive deeper into their communities. Is this an act of politics? Yes.

R. David Lankes is the director of the University of South Carolina’s School of Library and Information Science, and recipient of the American Library Association’s 2016 Ken Haycock Award for Promoting Librarianship. His book, The Atlas of New Librarianship won the 2012 ABC-CLIO/Greenwood Award for the Best Book in Library Literature. Lankes is a passionate advocate for librarians and their essential role in today’s society.

Let’s Talk About Power: Why Diversity and Cultural Competence are Important to LIS

As microcosms of larger society, libraries are faced with issues of inequity, discrimination, social privilege, and social marginalization. This webinar will briefly discuss the history of unequal access in LIS, and discuss the ways in which librarians can combat this history by becoming culturally competent professionals.

https://vimeo.com/215062869

Nicole A. Cooke is the Augusta Baker Chair at the School of Library and Information Sciences at the University of South Carolina. She holds an M.Ed in adult education from Pennsylvania State University and an MLS and Ph.D. in communication, information and library studies from Rutgers University. Her research and teaching interests include human information behavior (particularly in an online context), critical cultural information studies, and diversity and social justice in librarianship (with an emphasis on infusing them into LIS education and pedagogy). Cooke was named a “Mover & Shaker” by Library Journal in 2007 and was the 2016 recipient of ALA’s Equality Award and the Achievement in Library Diversity Research Award presented by ALA’s Office for Diversity, Literacy & Outreach. Her latest work is “Information Services to Diverse Populations” (Libraries Unlimited, 2016). Learn more at www.nicolecooke.info or follow her on Twitter @librarynicole.

Librarians as Active Bystanders: Centering Social Justice in LIS Practice

Librarians are social justice advocates and libraries are proponents of equal access; this access is not solely relegated to books and information within the library. This webinar will situate social justice within LIS and discuss ways for librarians to develop a socially just information practice.

https://vimeo.com/210659589

Nicole A. Cooke is the Augusta Baker Chair at the School of Library and Information Sciences at the University of South Carolina. She holds an M.Ed in adult education from Pennsylvania State University and an MLS and Ph.D. in communication, information and library studies from Rutgers University. Her research and teaching interests include human information behavior (particularly in an online context), critical cultural information studies, and diversity and social justice in librarianship (with an emphasis on infusing them into LIS education and pedagogy). Cooke was named a “Mover & Shaker” by Library Journal in 2007 and was the 2016 recipient of ALA’s Equality Award and the Achievement in Library Diversity Research Award presented by ALA’s Office for Diversity, Literacy & Outreach. Her latest work is “Information Services to Diverse Populations” (Libraries Unlimited, 2016). Learn more at www.nicolecooke.info or follow her on Twitter @librarynicole.

Post-Truth: Fake News and a New Era of Information Literacy

A recent Stanford Graduate School of Education study found that most students, middle school through college, struggled to distinguish between credible and unreliable news articles. Many adults have the same challenge.

Can you spot fake news? Do you know how to help others differentiate between truth and fiction? Join us to learn how you can be a better ambassador for information literacy.

Talk of fake news and the need for critical thinking skills have been in heavy rotation in the media in recent months, with new calls for the public to acquire appropriate research and evaluation skills and become more information savvy. However, none of this is new for librarians and information professionals, particularly for those who teach information literacy classes! With this renewed interest, librarians have brand new opportunities to impart these skills to patrons.

In this webinar, participants will:

  • Learn more about the rise of fake news, particularly those information behaviors that perpetuate its spread
  • Learn ways to identify fake news
  • Explore methods to help library patrons identify fake news

Nicole A. Cooke is the Augusta Baker Chair at the School of Library and Information Sciences at the University of South Carolina. She holds an M.Ed in adult education from Pennsylvania State University and an MLS and Ph.D. in communication, information and library studies from Rutgers University. Her research and teaching interests include human information behavior (particularly in an online context), critical cultural information studies, and diversity and social justice in librarianship (with an emphasis on infusing them into LIS education and pedagogy). Cooke was named a “Mover & Shaker” by Library Journal in 2007 and was the 2016 recipient of ALA’s Equality Award and the Achievement in Library Diversity Research Award presented by ALA’s Office for Diversity, Literacy & Outreach. Her latest work is “Information Services to Diverse Populations” (Libraries Unlimited, 2016). Learn more at www.nicolecooke.info or follow her on Twitter @librarynicole.

New Material Added Often

As with many things happening during this pandemic, things are changing often. We are building this site as fast as we can. So, please excuse the mess and check back here often to see what’s being added.

Have an idea or content to add? Please use the contact link to get in touch.

Here are some ideas we are gathering now:

  • Reading lists from class syllabi
  • Existing course lectures
  • Existing YouTube videos
  • Let’s set up a time to do an interview or chat
  • Have a topic and an hour, let’s set up a virtual office hour for folks to stop in.